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medical illustration for courtrooms
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medical illustration for courtrooms

CHARTS AND TIME LINES



(samples will be posted here soon)


Many medical cases involve large amounts of medical data and/or chronologies that can be organized and presented to the jury in a more meaningful and effective manner. Charts take data, which by itself can be difficult to demonstrate trends or abnormalities, and organize the values into more meaningful symbols that can be connected with visual elements to clearly show trends and deviations from norms. Our medical illustrators have advanced training and experience in information design so they know how to best interpret data and how to create charts that emphasize the message that you wish to get across.

Time lines and chronologies help to organize a series of events or a patient's history. In many cases, the passage of time plays a pivotal role in malpractice cases so it is important that time line graphics do not portray a distorted sense of time. Time-stamped events which are indicated on the time line should be spaced proportionally in comparison to surrounding events. Labels which point to the time line should also be placed as close to the actual time as possible in order to ensure an accurate representation of the sense of time.

Chronologies, or an ordered list of events, rely less on a specific time relationships. They function to present a summary of events for quick reference rather than to show temporal comparisons between individual events. Therefore, a different set of guidelines is used to create chronologies, with more emphasis on repetitive events such as multiple visits to the hospital, ongoing medication, or persistent pain.
If large amounts of data are to be displayed over a period of time, such as blood pressure measurements or blood oxygen levels, charts can be used to help show trends and deviations from normal ranges. Comprehending useful information from a long list of raw data is difficult for lay people to do. But when the data is graphed on a chart, information becomes quickly recognizable, and relationships among the data points becomes meaningful.

Combining timelines with chart data and/or illustrations can be a powerful way to correlate events and their consequences on the victim's health. This allows you to display the critical events along a timeline and include event-specific illustrations next to the events so that the viewer can get the whole picture of what is going on at that point in time.

When creating charts, graphs, time lines, and chronologies, it is important to hire experienced and knowledgeable designers who know how to take the raw data and organize it into a layout that gives clear meaning to the information and allows the viewer to comprehend important trends and relationships between the data entries. Our designers incorporate color, labels, and shapes along with principals of information design to emphasize the important messages and to ensure that the messages are clear and accurate.


Helpful Recommendations Regarding Charts and Time Lines
  • Not all charts are the same. Each set of data carries a different message and the overall message that you want to emerge from the data varies as well. If you use the same templates and just change the data, then you are doing your charts an injustice.
  • Minimize the amount of "ink" on the page. Many charts lose their effectiveness because they are cluttered with too much detail. Strip away any data or graphical elements that do not contribute to the overall message.
  • Do not distort the sense of time. When time is a sensitive issue, events along the timeline need to be spaced appropriately and proportionally to accurately reflect temporal relationships. Remember that the empty space between events also carries a message to the viewers.
  • Choosing the wrong graphical elements can throw off the message of your data. Even basic graphical elements such as color, can portray a completely different message when used with the same data.


Why Choose AMICUS for Charts and Time Lines?

Our team of designers and illustrators has extensive training in information design, having presented at national conferences on the topic. We've created hundreds of charts and graphs and have broad experience with a wide range of data sets and design techniques for best displaying that data. Contact AMICUS for further information or for a complimentary proposal.

medical illustration for courtrooms
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